Home » Have you been going to the toilet WRONG? Pelvic floor specialist reveals the unusual noise you should make on the loo to tackle constipation

Have you been going to the toilet WRONG? Pelvic floor specialist reveals the unusual noise you should make on the loo to tackle constipation

by Marko Florentino
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A pelvic floor specialist has revealed the correct way women should go to the toilet to avoid health problems, from constipation to haemorrhoids.

Core Restore Co specialist Heather Foord believes toilet talk should be anything but taboo and has helped educate and treat thousands of people when it comes to their pelvic floor and core dysfunction.

Pelvic floor dysfunction causes poor bowel habits, chronic constipation, and excess pushing on the toilet – struggles everyone has had to face at some point.

‘It should only take a few minutes to complete a bowel movement,’ she said.

‘If you’re sitting on the toilet for longer than five minutes, it can increase your risk of anal fissures and haemorrhoids, which are swollen veins in the rectum and anus that can cause pain, itchiness and general discomfort.’

Ms Foord explained: ‘Sitting and pushing for a long time increases the pressure that builds up inside your abdomen and this can hinder the return of the blood flow from the anus to the heart.

‘When this happens, the tiny blood vessels and veins in your anus can swell with blood and grow into grape-like knobs.’ 

Heather Foord, from Core Restore Co clinic, told FEMAIL that most people don't know the 'correct' way to go to the toilet

Heather Foord, from Core Restore Co clinic, told FEMAIL that most people don’t know the ‘correct’ way to go to the toilet

Do you need a toilet stool? 

The specialist also revealed everyone should invest in a toilet stool.

‘Who would’ve thought that all those years dropping it low on the dance floor was simply practice for giving your body the poop of your dreams?’ she joked.

‘The optimal positioning for you to complete a bowel movement is with your knees high in a deep squat position, which is why investing in a toilet stool to help prop them up is game-changing.

‘This position helps you relax the puborectalis muscle – which wraps around the intersection where the anal canal and rectum meet.

‘Imagine it like a poo traffic light. When it’s switched on and tight, it’s a red light that kinks the intersection to stop leakage. When it’s relaxed (or a green light), it straightens and helps you to empty your bowel properly.’

How do I deal with constipation?

Ms Foord shockingly revealed that ‘mooing’ like a cow can help cure constipation.

Start by breathing in deeply so that your belly relaxes and gets big. As you exhale, let your belly relax back.

‘Repeat this breath (with the belly growing big as you inhale) five times. Now, make an “Mmmmm” sound. This action helps your waist widen and creates pressure to help the bowel movement.

‘Bulge your belly out (really let it go) by saying the “Ooooo” sound. This helps your anal sphincter open. Keep going with the “Mmmm” and “Oooo” to continue generating pressure.’

A pelvic floor specialist has revealed the five ways every woman can get more out of her toilet time - and a health tip that could keep haemorrhoids at bay forever

A pelvic floor specialist has revealed the five ways every woman can get more out of her toilet time – and a health tip that could keep haemorrhoids at bay forever

What is the correct way to use toilet paper?

The professional revealed that most people tended to use toilet paper the wrong way.

Ms Foord recommends ditching toilet paper altogether for a bidet because the devices are more environmentally friendly and hygienic.

‘Take it easy on the back door and use toilet paper sparingly or not at all,’ she said. 

‘Firstly, if you are using toilet paper, try not to wipe aggressively; aim to blot gently. If you’re having to wipe more than three times, you could have fecal smearing as a result of weakness of the anal sphincter, haemorrhoids or anal scar tissue.’

What is ‘splinting’ and how can it help with constipation?

Ms Foord revealed a ‘mind blowing’ practice called vaginal splinting which is meant to aid constipation.

‘Splinting involves inserting a clean finger into your vagina to help push on the wall between the vagina and the rectum (otherwise known as the perineum). This pushes the poo out!

‘Although splinting is often recommended to help those who have a prolapse, using it to help evacuate an anal guest who’s overstayed their welcome is safe – just make sure you don’t have broken skin or an irritation that makes it painful or increases infection in the vagina.’

What do I do after I finish going to the toilet?

Ms Foord revealed you should always squeeze your pelvic floor muscles ‘up and in’ after you finish going to the toilet.

‘This helps lift your anus back into its correct position and closes it to help avoid anal leaking or smearing,’ she said.



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